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Author: Carla Camerieri

Friday Musings: Finding Nuance

Friday Musings: Finding Nuance

There are certain words in the English language that fascinate me. Cadence is one of them. I wrote an entire blog post about the particular and pleasing rhythm that certain people have when they speak or write. I suggested that I thought it was also possible for there to be cadence in life. I love the word somnambulism too, otherwise known as sleepwalking, and one of the words most likely to cause someone to lose in a spelling bee. I did not write a blog post about

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Music and Cocktails: Corkscrew to My Heart

Music and Cocktails: Corkscrew to My Heart

Bob Dylan’s 1975 Blood on the Tracks album has always been one of his most puzzling. The mystery begins the moment we try to delve into its meaning. Is it truly his attempt to deal with the break-up of his marriage, or is it not related to that at all? Jakob Dylan, his son, has been quoted as saying, “When I’m listening to ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues,’ I’m grooving along just like you. But when I’m listening to ‘Blood on the Tracks,’ that’s about my parents.” Yet Dylan

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Poetry in a Glass: Always Wrong to the Light

Poetry in a Glass: Always Wrong to the Light

A few weeks back I wrote a post about the poem “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath, in which I talked about the difficulty we sometimes have with seeing our own reflection, especially if we’re not being true to ourselves. Our poem for today, “For Once, Then, Something,” is one that was originally written by Robert Frost in 1920 for Harper’s Magazine, and then was later included in his Pulitzer Prize-winning book of poems called New Hampshire, published in 1923. Like “Mirror,” Frost’s

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Friday Musings: Lost and Found

Friday Musings: Lost and Found

There are certain losses in life that remain incomprehensible no matter how much we may try to assign meaning to them. Some come too early, some don’t follow the natural order we expect, and others should never occur at all. When they happen, something in our foundation shifts, and although we may remain upright, we are aware that we may never feel rock solid again. Other losses follow a more predictable order; we know that they are coming and have a lifetime to

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Poetry in a Glass: The Art of Losing

Poetry in a Glass: The Art of Losing

Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “One Art” is about the things we lose, and the extent to which we’ll go to convince ourselves that we’re coping, that loss is a part of life, that it isn’t, in her words, ever truly a disaster. If you’re unfamiliar with the poem, but you’re a fan of the movie In Her Shoes with Toni Colette and Cameron Diaz, you may remember it as the one that Maggie has difficulty reading to the professor. The entire process helps her to begin to overcome her struggle with

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