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Category: Poetry in a Glass

Poetry in a Glass: A Carefully Loaded Ship

Poetry in a Glass: A Carefully Loaded Ship

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry wrote The Little Prince, a sweetly sentimental novella deemed by The New Yorker Magazine to be “a seminal text for the sixties generation of dropouts and flower children.” That’s not exactly high praise for an author’s best known work, but I know that if I confess that I thoroughly enjoyed The Little Prince and that I cried at the end of it, I would not be alone in that admission. Although Saint-Exupéry was in Paris at the same time as Hemingway,

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Poetry in a Glass: Toothed Moon Rising

Poetry in a Glass: Toothed Moon Rising

Since it’s Halloween week, I became fairly obsessed with the idea of finding a poem for you today that would meet certain requirements. It had to be fairly high up on the creepiness scale, it had to convey the way in which the suddenly vacant landscape of autumn can be just a little bit unsettling, and it had to contain a ghost or haunting of some sort. That was a tall order, and I searched and searched before I found “All Hallows,” written by Louise Gluck, a Pulitzer prize-winning contemporary poet born in 1943 whose careful use of imagery and sparse language truly captures the feeling of both the holiday and the season. I’d never read it before, but it has lingered with me over the last few days, and I knew it would be perfect for today’s post. I was so fascinated by this poem, in fact, that I quickly ordered a collection of Gluck’s poetry so that I could read more. 

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Poetry in a Glass: Always Wrong to the Light

Poetry in a Glass: Always Wrong to the Light

A few weeks back I wrote a post about the poem “Mirror” by Sylvia Plath, in which I talked about the difficulty we sometimes have with seeing our own reflection, especially if we’re not being true to ourselves. Our poem for today, “For Once, Then, Something,” is one that was originally written by Robert Frost in 1920 for Harper’s Magazine, and then was later included in his Pulitzer Prize-winning book of poems called New Hampshire, published in 1923. Like “Mirror,” Frost’s

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Poetry in a Glass: The Art of Losing

Poetry in a Glass: The Art of Losing

Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “One Art” is about the things we lose, and the extent to which we’ll go to convince ourselves that we’re coping, that loss is a part of life, that it isn’t, in her words, ever truly a disaster. If you’re unfamiliar with the poem, but you’re a fan of the movie In Her Shoes with Toni Colette and Cameron Diaz, you may remember it as the one that Maggie has difficulty reading to the professor. The entire process helps her to begin to overcome her struggle with

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Poetry in a Glass: Night Visitor

Poetry in a Glass: Night Visitor

I confess that I had no real intention of choosing another haiku poem for this week’s post, but I was reading through a few of them yesterday morning and I came across one that was about a dragonfly, written by Matsuo Bashō.

     The dragonfly
Can’t quite land
on that blade of grass.

I was struck by the poem’s simplicity in much the same way as I was with the three that I shared last Monday, but there was something additional that made me gravitate towards this particular

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