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Poetry in a Glass: The Art of Losing

Poetry in a Glass: The Art of Losing

Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “One Art” is about the things we lose, and the extent to which we’ll go to convince ourselves that we’re coping, that loss is a part of life, that it isn’t, in her words, ever truly a disaster. If you’re unfamiliar with the poem, but you’re a fan of the movie In Her Shoes with Toni Colette and Cameron Diaz, you may remember it as the one that Maggie has difficulty reading to the professor. The entire process helps her to begin to overcome her struggle with

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Poetry in a Glass: Night Visitor

Poetry in a Glass: Night Visitor

I confess that I had no real intention of choosing another haiku poem for this week’s post, but I was reading through a few of them yesterday morning and I came across one that was about a dragonfly, written by Matsuo Bashō.

     The dragonfly
Can’t quite land
on that blade of grass.

I was struck by the poem’s simplicity in much the same way as I was with the three that I shared last Monday, but there was something additional that made me gravitate towards this particular

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Poetry in a Glass: Silver and Exact

Poetry in a Glass: Silver and Exact

Sylvia Plath’s poems, especially those that were written just before her suicide in 1963, are so raw with emotion that it can be hard to read them in any other way but as confessional. While it is undisputed that most of what she wrote did reflect the absolute turbulence of her mind during that time period, her poetry does transcend its autobiographical element and can offer us a means of connecting with our own emotional state, but only if we allow it. Sometimes when it is well known

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Poetry in a Glass: In Absentia

Poetry in a Glass: In Absentia

I first learned about Wallace Stevens in a grad school class where the assignment was to select one of his poems to explicate. I deliberately chose “Sunday Morning” because it was difficult, and I wanted a challenge, and I certainly was not disappointed in the least. Stevens is a perfect example of a Modernist poet who wrote about the world in an intellectual, impersonal, and objective manner. His vocabulary was tremendous, his attention to even the slightest detail was incredibly precise, and

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