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Tag: Thirsty Camel Cocktails

Poetry in a Glass: Night Visitor

Poetry in a Glass: Night Visitor

I confess that I had no real intention of choosing another haiku poem for this week’s post, but I was reading through a few of them yesterday morning and I came across one that was about a dragonfly, written by Matsuo Bashō.

     The dragonfly
Can’t quite land
on that blade of grass.

I was struck by the poem’s simplicity in much the same way as I was with the three that I shared last Monday, but there was something additional that made me gravitate towards this particular

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Friday Musings: Autumn and Everything After

Friday Musings: Autumn and Everything After

Of the four seasons, I’ve always felt as though autumn was the one that was most open to personal interpretation. The others just seem to be what they are. When we think about spring, our thoughts immediately go to rebirth, new beginnings, and a fresh start. It’s almost universal. Similarly, summer calls to mind togetherness, relaxation, and the reconnections that happen when you vacation with family and friends. Suddenly you’re sleeping under the same roof with your parents, siblings, or

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Wednesday Music and Cocktails: Autumn Dance

Wednesday Music and Cocktails: Autumn Dance

In 1972 Neil Young released the album Harvest and although the initial critical reviews of it were mixed, “Heart of Gold” became a number one hit that threw him suddenly into the limelight. Startled and uncomfortable, Young backpedaled and would later say in one of his most quoted lines that the record “put me in the middle of the road. Traveling there soon became a bore so I headed for the ditch. A rougher ride but I saw more interesting people there… when people start asking you to do

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Poetry in a Glass: Autumn Evening

Poetry in a Glass: Autumn Evening

There is something about haiku poetry that appeals to me very much. I’m sure it’s the austerity of it, and the careful word choice required in order to depict a thought that evokes a feeling that then inspires us to think about life, all in just 17 syllables. I have a book of haiku poems that my daughter, Wendy, gave me as a gift. The three poets in it write in the traditional Japanese style, and their work is believed to be essential to understanding the origin of haiku and its fundamental components.

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Friday Musings: What Love Reveals

Friday Musings: What Love Reveals

So let me begin this Friday Musings post with a confession. What you are reading is not what I had originally written for today. Not so scandalous, I know, but it’s important in a way. I began this week with a poem by Sylvia Plath that was about the reflection of ourselves that we see in a mirror, and continued that line of thought on Wednesday with a song from Counting Crows that was about a truer version of ourselves being pulled out from deep inside. Today’s post was supposed to be all

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